#sidescrollinggame

Renegade
AKA: Nekketsu Kouha Kunio Kun / 熱血硬派くにおくん
Technos / Taito 1987 / 1988

Unlike the arcade original, the Famicom conversion of Kunio-Kun received virtually no gameplay differences when localized for the NES. It did, however, change up many of the graphics and character designs, altering the theme of the game more than anything else. 
The plot elements of the original Kunio-Kun have been done away with, as both the opening sequence and ending are nowhere to be found. Here, the credits will initiate immediately upon completion. The gameplay, however, is complete in tact, there are zero differences to speak of.

The differences are merely cosmetic - Kunio Kun is replaced by a tough guy in a brown jacket named Mr. K, and most the enemy and boss sprites, as well as certain details of the level backgrounds and items, have also been adjusted accordingly. My favorite of these changes would have to be the second boss - in the Japanese version, Shinji was a standard Japanese gang leader, while here he's been replaced with Joel, a masked fighter sporting a Mohawk and shoulder pads - he looks like a Hokuto no Ken villain, and in my opinion, is the best thing to come out of this localization. 
Ultimately, the localization for Renegade doesn't leave me with a terrible amount to discuss - the changes are entirely superficial, so unless the removal of plot elements is a deal-breaker, which version you prefer will ultimately boil down to whether you prefer a Japanese bancho theme versus "The Warriors" adjacent. In either case, you're getting the greatest installment of the Kunio Kun franchise, and one of the best beat 'em ups of all time.

Rating: 8/10
Renegade
AKA: Nekketsu Kouha Kunio Kun / 熱血硬派くにおくん
Technos / Taito 1987 / 1988

Unlike the arcade original, the Famicom conversion of Kunio-Kun received virtually no gameplay differences when localized for the NES. It did, however, change up many of the graphics and character designs, altering the theme of the game more than anything else.
The plot elements of the original Kunio-Kun have been done away with, as both the opening sequence and ending are nowhere to be found. Here, the credits will initiate immediately upon completion. The gameplay, however, is complete in tact, there are zero differences to speak of.

The differences are merely cosmetic - Kunio Kun is replaced by a tough guy in a brown jacket named Mr. K, and most the enemy and boss sprites, as well as certain details of the level backgrounds and items, have also been adjusted accordingly. My favorite of these changes would have to be the second boss - in the Japanese version, Shinji was a standard Japanese gang leader, while here he's been replaced with Joel, a masked fighter sporting a Mohawk and shoulder pads - he looks like a Hokuto no Ken villain, and in my opinion, is the best thing to come out of this localization.
Ultimately, the localization for Renegade doesn't leave me with a terrible amount to discuss - the changes are entirely superficial, so unless the removal of plot elements is a deal-breaker, which version you prefer will ultimately boil down to whether you prefer a Japanese bancho theme versus "The Warriors" adjacent. In either case, you're getting the greatest installment of the Kunio Kun franchise, and one of the best beat 'em ups of all time.

Rating: 8/10
Puss 'N Boots: Pero's Great Adventure
Shouei / Electro Brain 1990

Puss 'N Boots is a game with a bizarre development history - it is often mistaken as being the US release of the Famicom Puss 'N Boots game, which was released several years earlier. In actuality, it is a separate game, albeit one that heavily recycles elements from the former, and strangely, also recycles content from Kamen no Ninja Akakage, an admittedly great game from the same developer.

Here, Pero controls very similarly to his earlier counterpart, though in addition to his gun, he has a couple extra weapons to play around with (ripped straight from Akakage): a bomb, and a boomerang. The vehicle stages make their return, and you'll play brief segments in boat, submarine, and up in the air in your plane and hot-air balloon. While the stages offer decent variety on the surface, they also play out rather slowly and offer little challenge (with a couple exceptions) therefore grow tired long before they should. 
The adventure is much shorter this time around, and mercifully so - your journey spans seven levels, some of which are multi-segmented. Unfortunately, there are only a total of four boss fights in the game - all but one of which are reused from Akakage, and two of which are fought on the final stage. The final stage is rather interesting by this game's standards, playing a bit more dynamic than its otherwise consistent left-to-right formula, and actually contains a simple maze to navigate in search of the end boss. Nothing about Puss N' Boots is done overwhelmingly poorly - it does contain admirable stage variety, and a few of the levels are even fun, if not a bit boring, but its lack of refinement is hard to overlook considering its year of release, though of course its strange development is responsible for most of its shortcomings. 
While not terrible, even for the time Puss 'N Boots feels dated by the fact that it borrows heavily from much earlier games, and only does the bare minimum in terms of improvements. I do like that it plays almost as a proto-Felix the Cat, and is still a worthy choice for "baby's first NES game", though is otherwise unremarkable.

Rating: 6/10
Puss 'N Boots: Pero's Great Adventure
Shouei / Electro Brain 1990

Puss 'N Boots is a game with a bizarre development history - it is often mistaken as being the US release of the Famicom Puss 'N Boots game, which was released several years earlier. In actuality, it is a separate game, albeit one that heavily recycles elements from the former, and strangely, also recycles content from Kamen no Ninja Akakage, an admittedly great game from the same developer.

Here, Pero controls very similarly to his earlier counterpart, though in addition to his gun, he has a couple extra weapons to play around with (ripped straight from Akakage): a bomb, and a boomerang. The vehicle stages make their return, and you'll play brief segments in boat, submarine, and up in the air in your plane and hot-air balloon. While the stages offer decent variety on the surface, they also play out rather slowly and offer little challenge (with a couple exceptions) therefore grow tired long before they should.
The adventure is much shorter this time around, and mercifully so - your journey spans seven levels, some of which are multi-segmented. Unfortunately, there are only a total of four boss fights in the game - all but one of which are reused from Akakage, and two of which are fought on the final stage. The final stage is rather interesting by this game's standards, playing a bit more dynamic than its otherwise consistent left-to-right formula, and actually contains a simple maze to navigate in search of the end boss. Nothing about Puss N' Boots is done overwhelmingly poorly - it does contain admirable stage variety, and a few of the levels are even fun, if not a bit boring, but its lack of refinement is hard to overlook considering its year of release, though of course its strange development is responsible for most of its shortcomings.
While not terrible, even for the time Puss 'N Boots feels dated by the fact that it borrows heavily from much earlier games, and only does the bare minimum in terms of improvements. I do like that it plays almost as a proto-Felix the Cat, and is still a worthy choice for "baby's first NES game", though is otherwise unremarkable.

Rating: 6/10
Power Blade 
Natsume / Taito 1991 
Power Blade is a Natsume masterpiece that loosely borrows elements from an earlier Famicom title, Power Blazer. With a greater sense of refinement, Power Blade vastly exceeds its source of inspiration.

It stars a fearless secret agent by the name of Nova, armed with a limitless supply of throwing boomerangs, as well as a high-tech suit of armor, the titular Power Blade. Your journey spans a total of seven levels, the first six of which can be chosen in any order. There are two difficulty settings, Normal and Expert, the latter of which features knock-back on damage taken, as well as a reduced time limit per stage.

In each level, you must locate a contact who'll grant you a key card when found. From there, you must find the gate to the boss's chamber, at which point they can be defeated to end the stage. While each of them are self-contained, some of the levels offer alternate paths and routes, and might require a small bit of exploring before finding your contact, although never in a way that grows confusing or tiresome. Nova's boomerangs can be thrown in one of all eight directions, as can the projectile in Power Blade form. While your 'rangs start off fairly weak, there are a ton of power-ups waiting to be collected from slain foes, including a multiplier to boost the number of boomerangs you can throw at one time, a star that'll increase your power meter, allowing you to throw them with greater range, and the red boomerang, offering a higher damage output. When equipped, the Power Blade suit grants you an even more destructive level of damage, as well as three additional points of damage, after which the suit will be lost until re-collected. There are two additional utility items to be found, including a ration to refill your health, and a bomb to destroy all on-screen enemies.

Power Blade is heavy on platforming, and offers a tremendous level of variety in both the enemies you'll encounter, as well as the traps and jumping puzzles you'll be put up against, with no two stages looking alike. Every stage throws something new your way, and as expected from a Natsume game, oozes top-notch design at every turn.

Rating: 9/10
Power Blade
Natsume / Taito 1991
Power Blade is a Natsume masterpiece that loosely borrows elements from an earlier Famicom title, Power Blazer. With a greater sense of refinement, Power Blade vastly exceeds its source of inspiration.

It stars a fearless secret agent by the name of Nova, armed with a limitless supply of throwing boomerangs, as well as a high-tech suit of armor, the titular Power Blade. Your journey spans a total of seven levels, the first six of which can be chosen in any order. There are two difficulty settings, Normal and Expert, the latter of which features knock-back on damage taken, as well as a reduced time limit per stage.

In each level, you must locate a contact who'll grant you a key card when found. From there, you must find the gate to the boss's chamber, at which point they can be defeated to end the stage. While each of them are self-contained, some of the levels offer alternate paths and routes, and might require a small bit of exploring before finding your contact, although never in a way that grows confusing or tiresome. Nova's boomerangs can be thrown in one of all eight directions, as can the projectile in Power Blade form. While your 'rangs start off fairly weak, there are a ton of power-ups waiting to be collected from slain foes, including a multiplier to boost the number of boomerangs you can throw at one time, a star that'll increase your power meter, allowing you to throw them with greater range, and the red boomerang, offering a higher damage output. When equipped, the Power Blade suit grants you an even more destructive level of damage, as well as three additional points of damage, after which the suit will be lost until re-collected. There are two additional utility items to be found, including a ration to refill your health, and a bomb to destroy all on-screen enemies.

Power Blade is heavy on platforming, and offers a tremendous level of variety in both the enemies you'll encounter, as well as the traps and jumping puzzles you'll be put up against, with no two stages looking alike. Every stage throws something new your way, and as expected from a Natsume game, oozes top-notch design at every turn.

Rating: 9/10
Ninja Gaiden III: The Ancient Ship of Doom
AKA: Ninja Ryuukenden III Yomi no Hakobune / 忍者龍剣伝III黄泉の方舟
Tecmo 1991 
While the first two installments of the Ninja Ryuukenden trilogy went practically untouched in their overseas releases (text language aside), the third game was given a notorious overhaul in terms of its balancing, a change which was either for better or for worse, depending on who you ask. 
Perhaps the biggest and most immediately noticeable change lies in its damage values. In Ninja Ryuukenden III, the majority of enemies will deal merely one point of damage off your life bar, but here, all single-damage enemies now deal two damage, two-damage enemies now deal three damage, and the dangerous hazards that formerly dealt three damage will now dish out a whopping six points of damage, meaning even from full health, you can perish in merely three hits. While this change reduces the amount of mistakes you're afforded, it can be dealt with via a simple shift in playstyle. Ninja Gaiden III emphasizes cautious play and mastery of its mechanics to mitigate damage taken.

A much more interesting change is that most of the items have been completely re-arranged here - in most cases, it forces you to hold out a bit longer for your sword upgrade, and the invincible Fire Wheel subweapon is now a heck of a lot more rare, a change that I believe is for the better. In Ninja Ryuukenden III, nearly every stage can be cheesed by simply grabbing the Fire Wheel, and activating your way to an easy victory. Here, you're forced to utilize a much greater variety of sub-weapons, making for different situations and a much more compelling game. 
A less notable change is the inclusion of extra enemy spawns, which again, works towards its favor to make the game more interesting. Some might scoff at the absence of checkpoints, and the limitation of continues, but none of these factors are an issue for experienced players anyway.

You can't go wrong with either version of Ninja Gaiden III - both are among the finest masterpieces on their respective systems, though the US version certainly has more edge to it, and is the superior game in my book.

Rating: 10/10
Ninja Gaiden III: The Ancient Ship of Doom
AKA: Ninja Ryuukenden III Yomi no Hakobune / 忍者龍剣伝III黄泉の方舟
Tecmo 1991
While the first two installments of the Ninja Ryuukenden trilogy went practically untouched in their overseas releases (text language aside), the third game was given a notorious overhaul in terms of its balancing, a change which was either for better or for worse, depending on who you ask.
Perhaps the biggest and most immediately noticeable change lies in its damage values. In Ninja Ryuukenden III, the majority of enemies will deal merely one point of damage off your life bar, but here, all single-damage enemies now deal two damage, two-damage enemies now deal three damage, and the dangerous hazards that formerly dealt three damage will now dish out a whopping six points of damage, meaning even from full health, you can perish in merely three hits. While this change reduces the amount of mistakes you're afforded, it can be dealt with via a simple shift in playstyle. Ninja Gaiden III emphasizes cautious play and mastery of its mechanics to mitigate damage taken.

A much more interesting change is that most of the items have been completely re-arranged here - in most cases, it forces you to hold out a bit longer for your sword upgrade, and the invincible Fire Wheel subweapon is now a heck of a lot more rare, a change that I believe is for the better. In Ninja Ryuukenden III, nearly every stage can be cheesed by simply grabbing the Fire Wheel, and activating your way to an easy victory. Here, you're forced to utilize a much greater variety of sub-weapons, making for different situations and a much more compelling game.
A less notable change is the inclusion of extra enemy spawns, which again, works towards its favor to make the game more interesting. Some might scoff at the absence of checkpoints, and the limitation of continues, but none of these factors are an issue for experienced players anyway.

You can't go wrong with either version of Ninja Gaiden III - both are among the finest masterpieces on their respective systems, though the US version certainly has more edge to it, and is the superior game in my book.

Rating: 10/10
Mickey Mousecapade 
AKA: Mickey Mouse Fushigi no Kuni no Daibouken / ミッキーマウス不思議の国の大冒険
Hudson Soft / Capcom 1987 / 1988 
To Western audiences, Mickey Mousecapade is often deemed the black sheep of the Capcom Disney game set, and the simple explanation for this is that it isn't truly a Capcom Disney game, but in actuality, a much earlier Hudson-developed game. While its development history answers for the fact that it's relatively primitive in comparison to the later Disney-based Capcom releases, there were also a vast number of interesting changes implemented when bringing the game to North America, outside of the clever wordplay in the title.

Many of the changes are merely visual - Mickey and Minnie's orb projectiles have been replaced with throwing stars. In fact, the appearance of nearly every collectible item has been changed, sadly even the health-refilling Donald Duck head, which has been replaced with a boring old diamond. More notably, many of the enemy and boss sprites have been fully swapped. While the characters in the original version were largely lifted from either Alice in Wonderland or Peter Pan, here a great variety of Disney properties were utilized. A few examples of this would be the final boss, who's the Queen of Hearts in the Japanese version, and Maleficent in this version. Or the fourth boss, where Captain Hook has been swapped out for a swashbuckling version of Pete.

Outside of the aesthetic differences, the game has also been rebalanced to make it a considerably easier experience than the Japanese original. While the original release starts you off with a very small health bar, which increases gradually after every stage, here you start with a ton of health right off the bat, which is especially noticeable in the ocean stage, where waves can spawn below you, and eat through your health in a flash. With so much health to spare, this level is essentially made trivial. 
Both versions of Mickey Mousecapade are worth playing, simply to enjoy the difference in character sprites - the original is surely the more challenging experience, though it's hard to go wrong with either. A nice early platformer, regardless of region.

Rating: 6/10
Mickey Mousecapade
AKA: Mickey Mouse Fushigi no Kuni no Daibouken / ミッキーマウス不思議の国の大冒険
Hudson Soft / Capcom 1987 / 1988
To Western audiences, Mickey Mousecapade is often deemed the black sheep of the Capcom Disney game set, and the simple explanation for this is that it isn't truly a Capcom Disney game, but in actuality, a much earlier Hudson-developed game. While its development history answers for the fact that it's relatively primitive in comparison to the later Disney-based Capcom releases, there were also a vast number of interesting changes implemented when bringing the game to North America, outside of the clever wordplay in the title.

Many of the changes are merely visual - Mickey and Minnie's orb projectiles have been replaced with throwing stars. In fact, the appearance of nearly every collectible item has been changed, sadly even the health-refilling Donald Duck head, which has been replaced with a boring old diamond. More notably, many of the enemy and boss sprites have been fully swapped. While the characters in the original version were largely lifted from either Alice in Wonderland or Peter Pan, here a great variety of Disney properties were utilized. A few examples of this would be the final boss, who's the Queen of Hearts in the Japanese version, and Maleficent in this version. Or the fourth boss, where Captain Hook has been swapped out for a swashbuckling version of Pete.

Outside of the aesthetic differences, the game has also been rebalanced to make it a considerably easier experience than the Japanese original. While the original release starts you off with a very small health bar, which increases gradually after every stage, here you start with a ton of health right off the bat, which is especially noticeable in the ocean stage, where waves can spawn below you, and eat through your health in a flash. With so much health to spare, this level is essentially made trivial.
Both versions of Mickey Mousecapade are worth playing, simply to enjoy the difference in character sprites - the original is surely the more challenging experience, though it's hard to go wrong with either. A nice early platformer, regardless of region.

Rating: 6/10
Low G Man 
1990 KID / Taxan

Low G Man is a strange side-scrolling platformer that serves almost as a blueprint for KID's action titles - it established many of the company's trademark quirks, such as the high jumping, the myriad of power-ups, the unique graphical style, and the emphasis on boss fights. As one of their earliest games, it's nowhere near as refined as some of their later outings, such as GI Joe and Kick Master.

The trait of high-jumping is highlighted more than any here, as it's basically the primary gimmick. Your hero, as the title implies, can leap high into the air, and can even collect power-ups that boost his jumping to even greater capacities, to the point where you can jump three times the height of the screen. Your method of attack is also rather unique - by tapping B, you'll shoot a freeze ray which will render enemies temporarily frozen, allowing you to use them as platforms, or get in some easy damage. The freeze ray itself does zero damage, to inflict the pain you'll have to hold up or down in combination with B, to strike with your spear. Both the spear and freeze ray can be upgraded multiple times to up your damage, range, and shot capacity. There are four unique subweapons that can also be collected from enemy drops, and leveled up from there. These include bombs, boomerangs, and two different types of energy beams. 
On top of your arsenal, there are also a number of vehicles that can be found and rode temporarily, including a walker robot, a spider robot, and a flying motorbike. The game is divided into five worlds, all but the last of which contain three levels, while the final world contains two. The stages themselves offer plenty of surprises, and are quite dynamic in design, but the real treat are the impressive bosses you'll find awaiting you at the end of every individual level, some of which take up the entire screen. 
There's no denying that Low G Man is rough around the edges - its controls aren't the smoothest, and the presence of occasional "dud" item drops that damage you is a bit of a low blow. Thankfully, what it does well is more than enough to make up for the general lack of refinement. 
Rating: 7/10
Low G Man
1990 KID / Taxan

Low G Man is a strange side-scrolling platformer that serves almost as a blueprint for KID's action titles - it established many of the company's trademark quirks, such as the high jumping, the myriad of power-ups, the unique graphical style, and the emphasis on boss fights. As one of their earliest games, it's nowhere near as refined as some of their later outings, such as GI Joe and Kick Master.

The trait of high-jumping is highlighted more than any here, as it's basically the primary gimmick. Your hero, as the title implies, can leap high into the air, and can even collect power-ups that boost his jumping to even greater capacities, to the point where you can jump three times the height of the screen. Your method of attack is also rather unique - by tapping B, you'll shoot a freeze ray which will render enemies temporarily frozen, allowing you to use them as platforms, or get in some easy damage. The freeze ray itself does zero damage, to inflict the pain you'll have to hold up or down in combination with B, to strike with your spear. Both the spear and freeze ray can be upgraded multiple times to up your damage, range, and shot capacity. There are four unique subweapons that can also be collected from enemy drops, and leveled up from there. These include bombs, boomerangs, and two different types of energy beams.
On top of your arsenal, there are also a number of vehicles that can be found and rode temporarily, including a walker robot, a spider robot, and a flying motorbike. The game is divided into five worlds, all but the last of which contain three levels, while the final world contains two. The stages themselves offer plenty of surprises, and are quite dynamic in design, but the real treat are the impressive bosses you'll find awaiting you at the end of every individual level, some of which take up the entire screen.
There's no denying that Low G Man is rough around the edges - its controls aren't the smoothest, and the presence of occasional "dud" item drops that damage you is a bit of a low blow. Thankfully, what it does well is more than enough to make up for the general lack of refinement.
Rating: 7/10
Adventure Island 2 - 1991
#adventureisland2 #nes #nintendo #8bit #lcd #hudsonsoft #1991 #wonderboy #adventureisland #sidescrollinggame #platformgame #nowproduction  #famicom #capulinita #camptosaurus #pteranodon #elasmosaurus #dinosaurs #pixels
#Repost Artist: @frankiesbugs
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Who's stoked for the next hollow knight game!? .
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Follow for daily gaming content! .
#hollowknight #indiegame #nindies #gametattoo #gameart #videogameart #gamer #gaming #guygamer #girlgamer #videogames #sidescrollinggame #arcadegames #retrogamer #oldschoolgamer #nintendoswitch #switch #indiegaming #indiegamer
#Repost Artist: @frankiesbugs
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Who's stoked for the next hollow knight game!? .
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Follow for daily gaming content! .
#hollowknight #indiegame #nindies #gametattoo #gameart #videogameart #gamer #gaming #guygamer #girlgamer #videogames #sidescrollinggame #arcadegames #retrogamer #oldschoolgamer #nintendoswitch #switch #indiegaming #indiegamer
Didn't know the source to give credit to the artist. Let me know if you know..
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 super in love with this game!!!
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follow for daily gaming content!
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#hollowknight #indiegame #nindies #gametattoo #gameart #videogameart #gamer #gaming #guygamer #girlgamer #videogames #sidescrollinggame #arcadegames #retrogamer #oldschoolgamer #nintendoswitch #switch #indiegaming #indiegamer
Didn't know the source to give credit to the artist. Let me know if you know..
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super in love with this game!!!
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follow for daily gaming content!
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#hollowknight #indiegame #nindies #gametattoo #gameart #videogameart #gamer #gaming #guygamer #girlgamer #videogames #sidescrollinggame #arcadegames #retrogamer #oldschoolgamer #nintendoswitch #switch #indiegaming #indiegamer
#Repost Artist: @_dannonka_ .
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follow for daily gaming content. .
What's your favorite part about this game? I love the dark asthetics and how much there is to explore on your own terms. .
#hollowknight #indiegame #nindies #gametattoo #gameart #videogameart #gamer #gaming #guygamer #girlgamer #videogames #sidescrollinggame #arcadegames #retrogamer #oldschoolgamer #nintendoswitch #switch #indiegaming #indiegamer
#Repost Artist: @_dannonka_ .
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follow for daily gaming content. .
What's your favorite part about this game? I love the dark asthetics and how much there is to explore on your own terms. .
#hollowknight #indiegame #nindies #gametattoo #gameart #videogameart #gamer #gaming #guygamer #girlgamer #videogames #sidescrollinggame #arcadegames #retrogamer #oldschoolgamer #nintendoswitch #switch #indiegaming #indiegamer
Ristar
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The game stars a cartoon star who uses his hands and long, stretchable arms to both move and combat enemies.
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#ristar #segagenesis #gaming #videogame #videogames #oldschoolgaming #retrogaming #1995 #steam #16bit #platformgame #2d #singleplayer #game #gamer #instagame #instagamer #instagamersgallery #segateam #steam #sidescrollinggame
Ristar
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The game stars a cartoon star who uses his hands and long, stretchable arms to both move and combat enemies.
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#ristar #segagenesis #gaming #videogame #videogames #oldschoolgaming #retrogaming #1995 #steam #16bit #platformgame #2d #singleplayer #game #gamer #instagame #instagamer #instagamersgallery #segateam #steam #sidescrollinggame
Miriam: The Escape, merupakan sebuah game puzzle arcade side scrolling yang dikembangkan oleh @tengle.games .

Sekilas game ini terlihat seperti game Limbo namun game ini mempunyai latar yang berbeda, untuk Limbo sendiri latar tempatnya menceritakan kehidupan setelah kematian, dan pada game Miriam: The Escape ini menceritakan seorang gadis yang berusaha menemukan jalan keluar dari mimpi buruknya. 
Ada sekitat 4 chapter dan 24 stage dengan puzzle dan tingkat kesulitan yang berbeda beda. Selain itu juga, terdapat 3 multiple ending yang dapat kalian temui di game ini.

Bagi kalian yang suka game puzzle gak ada salahnya untuk mencoba game yang satu ini. 
Kalian bisa temukan game ini di playstore dan unduh secara Gratis.

#androidgamereview #androidgames #mobilegames #androidgamesindonesia #mobilegamesindonesia #indiegames #adventuregames #puzzlegame #sidescrollinggame #miriamtheescape #tenglegames
Miriam: The Escape, merupakan sebuah game puzzle arcade side scrolling yang dikembangkan oleh @tengle.games .

Sekilas game ini terlihat seperti game Limbo namun game ini mempunyai latar yang berbeda, untuk Limbo sendiri latar tempatnya menceritakan kehidupan setelah kematian, dan pada game Miriam: The Escape ini menceritakan seorang gadis yang berusaha menemukan jalan keluar dari mimpi buruknya.
Ada sekitat 4 chapter dan 24 stage dengan puzzle dan tingkat kesulitan yang berbeda beda. Selain itu juga, terdapat 3 multiple ending yang dapat kalian temui di game ini.

Bagi kalian yang suka game puzzle gak ada salahnya untuk mencoba game yang satu ini.
Kalian bisa temukan game ini di playstore dan unduh secara Gratis.

#androidgamereview #androidgames #mobilegames #androidgamesindonesia #mobilegamesindonesia #indiegames #adventuregames #puzzlegame #sidescrollinggame #miriamtheescape #tenglegames
#sony #sonygame #sonygames #sonygamer #sonyplaystation4 #sonyps4 #sonyps4game #sonyps4games #whiterabbit #adultswim #adultswimgames #deathsgambit #greatgame #greatgames #goodgame #goodgames #actiongame #actiongames #rpg #rpggames #bloodygame #hardgame #hardgames #difficultgame #difficultgames #sidescrolling #sidescrollinggame i cleared this game today oh yeah. Great and hard AF game. Specialy the second last boss. What a piece of Aaaaass. This game gets 8.2 out of 10.
#sony #sonygame #sonygames #sonygamer #sonyplaystation4 #sonyps4 #sonyps4game #sonyps4games #whiterabbit #adultswim #adultswimgames #deathsgambit #greatgame #greatgames #goodgame #goodgames #actiongame #actiongames #rpg #rpggames #bloodygame #hardgame #hardgames #difficultgame #difficultgames #sidescrolling #sidescrollinggame i cleared this game today oh yeah. Great and hard AF game. Specialy the second last boss. What a piece of Aaaaass. This game gets 8.2 out of 10.

Contik - это обзорщик фото и видео из Инстаграма.